Forest + Found

Forest + Found

Artists Max Bainbridge and Abigail Booth set up their studio practice, Forest + Found, in early 2015 as a space for material research and cross disciplinary collaboration. Driven by a need to create work that explores dialogues between sculpture, painting and a new found language of craft, their studio gives them a space for material experimentation, as well as a platform to explore their individual art practices. Working in both visual arts and contemporary craft, they exhibit their work throughout the UK and internationally.

ABIGAIL BOOTH
Born in London in 1991, Abigail Booth studied Fine Art at Byam Shaw School of Art, the San Francisco Art Institute and Chelsea College of Art, where she graduated in 2013 as a painter and sculptor. Working across textiles, drawing and painting, her work explores the histories of piecework, pigment and cloth. Referencing simplicity in the gesture and movement of the hand, her work seeks a connection to the psychology of landscape through the reflective nature of organic colour and embodied interactions with the natural. The time-based nature of her work produces large-scale images that explore the liminal space of the constructed canvas, while challenging the relationship between the imagined and the actual through her use of a material language of painting and textile combined.

MAX BAINBRIDGE
Born in London in 1991, Max Bainbridge studied Fine Art at Chelsea College of Art, where he graduated in 2013 as a photographer and sculptor. Bainbridge’s sculptural vessels hewn from wood, reflect a need to create a tangible and grounded presence in space though the physicality of the object. Taking the natural shape and form of the wood as a starting point, he uses woodturning, hand carving and elemental processes to create objects that are reflective of the making process; each piece displaying the physical effort that goes into its conception through the marks left on the surface. Working with wood sourced directly from the landscape, his work forms a deep connection to place through the ritualistic relationships he builds between objects and their origin.